Locals go out of their way to help the bison

Print Article

  • YOUNG GRETA the baby bison, next to her temporary mon, Nichole Glase, and the rest of her animal family. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

  • 1

    BABY BISON Greta lays next to her bedmat at the Bela Animal Rescue Center in VIctor, Montana. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

  • 2

    NICHOLE GLASE and the young bison, Greta. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

  • YOUNG GRETA the baby bison, next to her temporary mon, Nichole Glase, and the rest of her animal family. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

  • 1

    BABY BISON Greta lays next to her bedmat at the Bela Animal Rescue Center in VIctor, Montana. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

  • 2

    NICHOLE GLASE and the young bison, Greta. (John Dowd/Clark Fork Valley Press)

Of the many incredible animals in the United States few stand up in comparison to the mighty American bison.

When Europeans settled in the Americas there were more than 30 million bison spread from Canada to Mexico. There were herds so vast that they covered the horizon and each animal was composed of such size that it is no wonder that the Native Americans viewed them as one of the most sacred of animals, and why in modern times there was an effort to make them the national mammal. Today, there are few wild bison left and most are confined to zoos and private ranches.

Young bison are difficult to care for, and are extremely intelligent, as most ranchers will attest. They are emotionally needy, attach easily, and can have sensitive internal systems. They stress readily and have a strong herd mentality which makes them very social. Unlike many large farmed animals, bison will not care for multiple young at a time, usually because their milk production is rarely enough to provide for more than one. These left-over twin births can be quite difficult to raise without the assistance of the natural mother. One such case of this was orphaned young Greta.

Greta was born on the Bitterroot Bison Ranch and her mother decided to pick her brother to care for instead of her. Greta is what is called a freemartin female. This is a perplexing genetic abnormality that occurs in mixed-sex births where a set of twins are born, one being female and one being male. This “freemartin birth” often leaves the female born sterile. It is almost always the case in these such twin births for many cattle species, including bison.

Because of the difficulty that comes with raising an individual baby bison, Greta needed special help. She was going to be cared for by a local, Jaysen McCleary, who was out of town. He posted on Facebook for temporary help and got in contact with a friend who could care for Greta until he returned. Greta was then taken on by Nichole Glase, Jaysen’s friend who is a Plains local, when the young bison was only three days old.

Greta needs to eat every four hours without skipping a beat and, because bison are far more like sheep internally than they are cows, Greta even needs lambs’ milk formula instead of cattle formula to survive. At three days old Greta was already around 50 pounds. Bison are born large and grow very fast, so Greta more than doubled her food intake within the first two weeks.

Since bison need social groups, and because they are such large animals, they need to live in vast areas. Unfortunately, Nichole was raising Greta in a small fenced in area in her backyard and Greta needed more.

Enter the Bela Animal Rescue, a non-profit organization located outside of Victor, Montana, operated by McCleary. Bela Rescue is already home to a slowly growing herd of 6 bison, and a few dogs. They specialize in legal defense for unconstitutional encroachment on owners and their beloved pets, as well as providing abandoned and special needs animals with housing and/or assistance.

Now, Greta has the room to grow, and the expertise to keep her healthy.

For those who wish to get involved, or donate to help Greta, or any of the other animals at the rescue ranch, the website is belarescue.org. They can also be found on Facebook at Bela Animal Legal Defense and Rescue.

Print Article

Read More Local News

Sixth Annual Artists in Paradise event this week

July 18, 2019 at 11:26 am | Clark Fork Valley Press July and August are busy times of the year for Sanders County and many events have been occurring annually for years, including the Artists in Paradise. Entering its sixth year, it has many exciting...

Comments

Read More

Local family gets a wave of support from community after traumatizing accident in June

July 18, 2019 at 11:25 am | Clark Fork Valley Press Saturday, June 22, six people were involved in a three-vehicle head-on collision, severely injuring three of them, on U.S. 93 south of Kalispell. One of those vehicles involved the Scarberry fami...

Comments

Read More

West End Fire Dept. learns ‘Tennessee Twist’

July 17, 2019 at 10:47 am | Mineral Independent The West End Volunteer Fire and Rescue members practiced old and new methods of extricating an injured person from a crashed SUV recently at the Saltese Station. Saturday, July 6, volunteers used ...

Comments

Read More

Mineral County Library hosts summer reading finale

July 17, 2019 at 10:46 am | Mineral Independent ...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(406) 826-3402
105 W. Lynch
P.O. Box 667
Plains, MT 59859

©2019 Clark Fork Valley Press | Mineral Independent Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X